Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Stress Management Summit Philadelphia, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Harry L Campbell

Biofeedback Resources International, USA

Keynote: Does breathing really help you relax? Technical evidence

Time : 10:00-10:40

Conference Series Stress Management-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Harry L Campbell photo
Biography:

Harry Campbell has worked in the biofeedback field since 1984. His experience is in providing biofeedback equipment for measuring EMG - muscle tension, skin temperature, respiration, heart rate - HRV, EEG - Neurofeedback - brain wave activity, and blood pressure for stress management, rehabilitation, physical therapy, performance enhancement, educational, and substance abuse applications. He also has experience in training health care professionals in the use of biofeedback equipment as well as working with patients and clients. He is currently seeing clients in the Bronx, NY. He supplies biofeedback equipment and training to the military and Veterans Administration through our GSA Federal Supply Schedule contract.

Abstract:

For thousands of years people have been using breathing techniques to relax for health, mental, and spiritual purposes. How many times someone tell someone else to take a deep breath and relax when they are getting stressed or upset? Respiration Biofeedback is a tool to help measure the mechanics of breathing. It detects movement of the abdomen and or chest to show the speed and depth, and location of breathing. HRV (Heart Rate Variability) Biofeedback uses computerized technology to measure the changes in Heart Rate which can greatly affected by changes in breathing. Capnograph Biofeedback measures the changes in expired CO2 which also can be greatly affected by changes in breathing. This presentation will discuss these modalities and how they are used to show people how to use something that is under their control, their breath, to affect their nervous systems in a positive way to improve their physical and mental health, and performance. Some clinical symptoms this is applied to include anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and panic.

Break: Coffee Break 10:40-11:00 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

Esther Louise Sabban

New York Medical College, USA

Keynote: Stress: The good, the bad and the ugly

Time : 11:00-11:40

Conference Series Stress Management-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Esther Louise Sabban photo
Biography:

Esther Louise Sabban, completed her PhD and postdoctoral training at New York University Medical Center. Currently, she is Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of Laboratory of Stress-Related Disorders at New York Medical College. She is past-president of the Catecholamine Society and Secretary/Treasurer of Endocrine and Metabolism Section of American Physiological Association. She has published over 160 peer reviewed articles, and co-authored 4 books on molecular and neuroendocrine aspects of stress. She is currently on the editorial boards of American Journal of Hypertension and of Stress and is a handling editor for the Journal of Neurochemistry.

Abstract:

The talk will begin with a historical prospective on stress and its definition that brings us to the modern concept of allostasis, or adaptation through change. The major molecular and physiological changes in response to stress will be discussed, specifically the immediate catecholaminergic response, in the brain and periphery, and the activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Differences in mechanisms in response to acute and chronic stress need to be considered and subsequently how these are associated with the increased propensity to various diseases, with specific examples and some new treatment strategies. Specific influences on stress response, from early life experience, genetic and epigenetic differences and gender influence the response to stress and their consequences. The talk will end with an overview of some of the important questions that need to be addressed in the field of stress.

Keynote Forum

Mette Mouritsen

Bevidst Medicine, Denmark

Keynote: Stress

Time : 11:40-12:20

Conference Series Stress Management-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mette Mouritsen photo
Biography:

Mette Mouritsen has been working as MD for 25 years. The last 14 years she had a traditional public, medical clinic in general medicine, every day meeting frustrated people with symptoms, diseases and existential problems. She started to train Mindfulness in 2006 and this brought me further on to a 4 years psychotherapeutic study in integral psychotherapy, it brought her so much insight and valuable tools. A kind of a self-healing process, she started to facilitate groups with my clients after daily work. The primary “tool she used in the groups was mindfulness, to bring relaxation, calmness, and focus, and then she just kept an openhearted space in the room together with the other group members.Now her primary work is with people with stress, individual and in groups. Stress is a wonderful word, it opens doors to discover, whatever may trigger the stress reaction in the body-mind. She uses her knowledge as a doctor, mindfulness instructor and psychotherapist. It really brings the possibility to integrate the aspects of the body-mind and spirit.

Abstract:

Stress is a worldwide problem that seems to have emerged and on the way to peak in this century. Nevertheless it may also change our lives, in a positive direction, when we learn to balance it. Almost everyone knows about stress, either from themselves or from others, and yet the stress experience is very individual, although it is triggered in the same way. What is behind these seemingly contradictions? What great gifts might be hidden behind stress? Why do we increasingly stress, and why do we get stress related diseases? How may we all contribute to reduce stress? I hope that during the congress we may support each other in becoming wiser on these opening questions. I will initiate with my experiences and propositions.

Keynote Forum

Christina Darviri

University of Athens, Greece

Keynote: Shaping the future of stress science: The experience from Greece

Time : 12:20-13:00

Conference Series Stress Management-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christina Darviri photo
Biography:

Christina Darviri is a Professor of Prevention and Health Promotion and since 2008, the Scientific Coordinator of the MSc entitle “The Science of Stress and Health Promotion” at the Medical School of the Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. She lectures on stress related nosology, lifestyle and stress, efficient stress management and the connection between stress and health promotion overall. She has been the principal investigator of many research projects focusing mainly on healthy longevity and how life style impacts stress.

Abstract:

Chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs) have a major impact on both the individual and the society. Cardiovascular disease followed by cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes type 2, are the four main causes of morbidity and mortality in the modern world, and negative life style choices, such as an unhealthy diet, a sedentary life, and the abuse of tobacco and alcohol are key risk factors for all the aforementioned diseases. Interestingly, only recent has biomedical research highlighted the catalytic role of stress in the CNCDs epidemic. Of course, people under stress, are less likely to comply with interventions aiming at a healthier life style while stress itself can be a triggering, permissive, and/or causal factor for most chronic diseases. Also, quite often adopting an unhealthy life style is a nonadaptational way to cope with stress. The psychoneuroendocrinology of stress is a fascinating, rapidly developing scientific field. The pertinent research has already yielded apt evidence of several neurohormonal mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of CNCDs. Furthermore, brain imaging studies have disclosed the fundamental role of stress-related brain areas in lifestyle decision making and psychiatric nor somatic diseases. For the past 8 years, we have been running a postgraduate course entitled “The science of Stress and Health Promotion”. For the first time, a medical school program offers the opportunity to its students and the public to fully understand the concept of stress, in terms of neurophysiology and endocrinology, as well as the mechanisms and pathways through which stress impacts on health and disease. Students learn how to clinically assess and measure stress and to design and implement an effective stress management program in different populations and settings. Our research has shown that an effective stress management program entails fundamental aspects of daily living, such as diet, exercise, regularity of sleep and eating and several stress coping techniques. The program in over 40 published studies has shown the effectiveness of such an approach in reducing stress in children and adults and in people suffering from various diseases, such as depression, asthma, diabetes, breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and obesity/metabolic syndrome, as well as in people with sleep quality problems, tobacco addiction, gambling, etc. We have recently implemented a holistic stress management intervention for essential hypertension. In this prospective two-armed study we found beneficial effects of stress management both for blood pressure control and lifestyle modifications.

Break: Lunch Break: 13:00-14:00 @ Benjamin
  • Workshop

Session Introduction

Harry L Campbell

Biofeedback Resources International, USA

Title: Biofeedback as a therapy for stress related disorder

Time : 14:00-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Harry L Campbellhave worked in the biofeedback field since 1984. His experience is in providing biofeedback equipment for measuring EMG - muscle tension, skin temperature, respiration, heart rate - HRV, EEG - Neurofeedback - brain wave activity, and blood pressure for stress management, rehabilitation, physical therapy, performance enhancement, educational, and substance abuse applications. He also has experience in training health care professionals in the use of biofeedback equipment as well as working with patients and clients. He is currently seeing clients in the Bronx, New York.

Abstract:

Biofeedback is a tool to help people see things that are normally not obvious to them. Biofeedback uses computerized technology to help you learn to control or manage your stress responses. Sensitive instruments are used to measure physical processes with the purpose of “feeding back” the information to an individual in order to control these processes. Clinical Applications: Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, panic attack all are related to an over active autonomic nervous system. What is going on in the mind is affecting the body. The overactive nervous system also affects the mind. It can become a cycle that feeds upon itself. Part of what biofeedback does is gives you a way to quantify what the nervous system is doing and how what you teach your clients changes the state of the nervous system. It is much easier for a person to learn to change the state of their nervous system when they have sensitive information on how it is reacting or responding. With these stress disorders we commonly use skin temperature, skin conductance (sweat), heart rate/heart rate variability, and respiration biofeedback. Chronic pain including headaches, neck pain, and back pain are often related to excess, chronic muscular contraction. This is why muscle relaxant medications are often prescribed for pain. Clients suffering from chronic pain are often unaware that they are contracting muscles as much as they are. EMG biofeedback can be used to quickly show a person an exact measurement of their level of muscle contraction. They can then learn to release the tension through this feedback combined with techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation. Some stress disorders are conditions that involve interrupted patterns in brain activity. EEG Biofeedback or Neurofeedback detects and gives feedback on the amplitude of the various electrical frequencies including Delta, Theta, Alpha, and Beta as well as other measures like coherence. This can help the brain to regulate and return to a more normal pattern usually improving symptoms.

Break: Coffee Break: 16:00-16:20 @ Foyer
  • Stress Management and Therapy
Speaker

Chair

Esther Louise Sabban

New York Medical College, USA

Session Introduction

Ahmed Alkhalaf

Albaha University, Saudi Arabia

Title: Perceived stress and general health in medical students in Saudi Arabia

Time : 16:20-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

He is working in the Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University as Assistant Professor of Behavioural Sciences & Consultant of Clinical Psychology. He is interested in clinical and health psychology for adolescents and adults. He received Master of Science (MSc) in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Wales University (UK) & He obtained a Ph.D. in clinical health psychology from the University of Plymouth (UK). He had served as a Psychologist to Alamal Complex for Mental Health inpatient treatment teams, providing a broad range of behavioral health services to adult inpatients. Those services had included treatments for depression, phobias, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, Anxiety disorder, Schizophrenia, Bipolar disorder and addiction for four years (Psychiatry wards and addiction wards. He utilizes a variety of psychology intervention to treat patients including cognitive behavioral therapy and positive psychotherapy) with adults. He has experience of working in a variety of adult mental health services, from primary to tertiary care (e.g. Traumatic Brain Injuries TBI, Spinal Cord Injury SCI and Stroke CVA). As a clinician, He had a particular interest in Neuropsychological assessment and cognitive behavior therapy for depression and anxiety disorders. I joined the department of psychology as a Graduate Teaching Assistant (Health Psychology) at the University of Plymouth in southern England for two years. He is a chartered Psychologist from the British Psychological Society (BPS). He had an experience in teaching in evidence-based methods of assessing psychological disorders and training in clinical and health psychology.

Abstract:

How perceived stress appears to be very important role entity in all students. The students of medicine experience very high stress during their undergraduate study. Hence the objective of this study was to evaluate general health condition and the perceived stress and also to examine the correlation between general health condition and perceived stress. This study included 185 male students from the second to the sixth year of the MBBS. In this study general health was assessed by using SF-36 health survey, student Perceived Stress was measured by Perceived Stress Scale. Statistical analysis indicated the general health condition of students was significantly correlated with how the students perceived the stress in particular with the following subscales of the SF-36 health survey: - Role Physical RP - General Health Perceptions GH - Vitality VT - Role Emotional RE - Mental Health MH

B Ramesh Babu

Raichur Institute of Medical Sciences, India

Title: Prevalence of depression among HIV patients on antiretro viral therapy

Time : 16:50-17:20

Speaker
Biography:

Dr B Ramesh Babu has completed M.B.B.S from Mysore University and Post Graduate in Psychiatry from Jawaharlal Institute Of post graduate medical education and research(JIPMER), Pondicherry.which is a premier institute and a institute of national importance in government of India. Subsequently he worked in Humber Mental Health NHS Trust, Leeds Foundation NHS trust ,SEPT NHS Trust ,UK in various capacity.Currently working as Associate Professor of Psychiatry in Raichur Institute of Medical Sciences.I am also Heading the Department of Psychiatry and also providing Forensic Psychiatry services to the Excise and Prison inmates.My area of interest is in organic and rehabilitation Psychiatry.I am currently heading a rehabilitation project called ‘Manasa Kendra’ from Disability and Senior Citizen welfare Department. He had published and presented on more than 10 scientifically relevant topics in various Journals and also in television and Radio program. I am the serving member of Karnataka state Mental Health authority and a serving member of academic council of the Institute.

Abstract:

Addressing the Mental health issues in human immune virus [HIV] infected patients is important due to prolonged survival rates following antiretro viral therapy (ART). In particular, studying the co morbid depression is assuming importance as growing bodies of evidence have suggested that chronic depression and stressful life events correlate with the viral loads, and CD4 counts in these patients; thus depression has a direct and an indirect influence on the treatment outcomes. Literature on this issue remains scant in the developing countries hence, we conducted a cross sectional study with an objective assessing the prevalence of depression in the patients with HIV infection. Becks Depression inventory (BDI) was administered to the HIV patients visiting ART Centre at Raichur institute of Medical Sciences, Raichur. Depression was classified based on the ratings. Depression in HIV may be due to several mechanisms. Brain structural neuro imaging studies in HIV patients have shown decreased volumes particularly the white matter in the frontal and the temporal lobes .Studies have also suggested that, ART results in premature cortical atrophy. Direct toxic effect of HIV virus on the nervous system and the immune system mediated damage of the neurons particularly by the monocyte activation may be other possible mechanism. In addition cytokines particularly IL6 is associated with the increased depression and stress in the HIV infected individual. Therefore it is important to address depression in HIV infected individuals as, depression is found to be one of the predictors of adherence to ART. Also future treatment guidelines should incorporate strategies to detect and treat depression in HIV patients as, depression has a prominent influence on the course of the illness. Future studies may be required to evaluate the3 benefits of prescribing anti-depressants to these patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Christina Darviri is a Professor of Prevention and Health Promotion and since 2008, the Scientific Coordinator of the MSc entitle “The Science of Stress and Health Promotion” at the Medical School of the Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. She lectures on stress related nosology, lifestyle and stress, efficient stress management and the connection between stress and health promotion overall. She has been the principal investigator of many research projects focusing mainly on healthy longevity and how life style impacts stress.

Abstract:

Lifestyle interventions for blood pressure (BP) treatment are characterized by a low adherence rate. Self-management is integral for BP treatment and involves the acquisition of new skills. Stress management and lifestyle change programs seem to have an additional effect in the development of self-management and BP control. This was a quasi-experimental design with a waitlist control group and was funded from EPANAD 2007-2013. The study comprised an 8-week stress management and lifestyle change program, including weekly sessions (stress management, dietary counseling and physical exercise). In the 8th week, qualitative data were recorded. All semi-structured interviews were transcribed, and coding derived from repeated themes. Post-intervention, 53.8% of the participants reported walking more than 8.000, steps/day (17.3% reported walking over 10.000, steps/day). According to the WHO, a mean of 10.000, steps/day is required for a healthy lifestyle. Regarding dietary habits, there was a significant increase in water and vegetable/fruit consumption (80.9% and 76.4%, respectively) and a significant reduction in sodium intake (80.9%). Approximately, 60.9% of the participants experienced significant improvement sleep quality. Relaxation breathing and progressive muscular relaxation were implemented by 80.1% of the sample. Approximately 43.6% of the participants mentioned positive thinking and anger management, and 35.3% reported better mood regulation and a sense of relaxation. Of the 19.5% of the participants who reported BP regulation/reduction, 10.8% devoted more time to themselves, and 9% managed to set goals. This non-pharmaceutical stress management and lifestyle change program resulted in significant benefits of the regulation of BP as well as for lifestyle change.